Unit Objectives and Standards Alignment
Course Intro, Industrialization, and Progressivism ( 9 Weeks)

Essential Questions/Essential Understandings
Industrialization (inventions and new sources of wealth and power) truly revolutionized the world. Although more of a process than a single "revolution," it changed every aspect of an individual’s life. Studying Industrialization should be taken into two-step. First what is industrialization and second how did people respond to it upheaval of traditional societies. The Progressives should be seen as a response to the early process of industrialization in Western Europe and the United States. Movements of crusaders, inspired by ideas of liberalism and socialism, wanted to either correct the abuses of the process of industrialization or radically reorganize society using new industrial groups and energy. Once reform was begun it spilled into other areas such as human rights. Students who have successful learned about this era should be able to answer the following questions well: 1. Why do people invent things? How might new sources of power change people's lives? 2. How did the Industrial Revolution raise the standard of living? 3. How might the Industrial Revolution have made people's lives worse? 4. How might people improve their working condition? What is a progressive? Where does the name come from and what are the different types of progressives? 5. What were the major goals of progressives in terms of the economy, government, and social culture? 6. What were some rights we have today that were won by the progressives?

Industrialization, Invention, Pros and Cons of Industrialization, progressive movement, socialism (communism), conservation, labor unions, feminism

Standards and Benchmarks
Reading Strategies - 1.1.1 Students extend and apply prereading strategies over increasingly complex reading tasks.
Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications
Reading Strategies - 1.2.2 Students draw inferences and make generalizations.
Reading Strategies - 1.2.3 Students use a variety of study skills (graphic organizers, note-making) to clarify meaning and recognize organizational patterns.
Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications
Reading Strategies - 1.4.3 Students recall and organize information to clarify understanding (note-taking, summary, outline, chronology, cause & effect).



RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Time, Continuity, Change - 1.2 Identify and evaluate long-term changes, enduring influences, and recurring patterns in world history. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Time, Continuity, Change - 1.5 Analyze the impact of revolution on politics, economies, and societies. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Time, Continuity, Change - 1.6 Understand how ideals and institutions of freedom, equality, justice, and citizenship have changed over time and from one society to another. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.1 Understand basic economic concepts. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.3 Explain patterns of trade from ancient times to the present. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.5 Analyze relationships between economic activity and patterns of trade and migration. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.7 Describe reciprocal influences of changes in transportation and communication and changes in trade and economic activities. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Science, Technology and Society - 8.2 Understand why different socio-economic groups within a culture may react differently to technological innovation. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Science, Technology and Society - 8.4 Evaluate whether changing technologies create new ethical dilemmas or make existing ethical dilemmas more acute. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Science, Technology and Society - 8.7 Understand that the principal contexts of technological innovation and scientific research are commercial and military and understand the implications of these contexts. [x] RIST: Social Studies, Grades 9 - 12 , Science, Technology and Society - 8.12 Analyze social, moral, ethical, religious, and legal issues arising from technological developments and scientific developments [x]

Skills
Library Research, Note taking using outlines, active reading

Learning Activities & Curric/Cultural Connections
Powerpoint Lessons:
-Social Studies 9 and 10 day 1
­-Social Studies 9 Lesson 2
-Social Studies 9: The Industrial Revolution Continued
-The Progressive Movement

-Watch “Newsies” and relate the labor movements that take place in the movie to what is being discussed in class.
-Progressive Groups Project
-Picture Note cards activity
-Picture note cards pictionary
-Industrial Revolution KWL activity
-Cottage Industry vs. Factory activity
-Cottage Industry vs. Factory Venn Diagram
-5WH notes activity on transportation improvements during the Industrial Revolution

Language Functions
List and explain, pros and cons (t-charts), graphic organizer, reading termoninology, Two-column notes, Outlines, "a.k.a.", "an event", Venn Diagrams, vocabulary picture note-cards.

Resources
Powerpoint Lessons:
-Social Studies 9 and 10 day 1
­-Social Studies 9 Lesson 2
-Social Studies 9: The Industrial Revolution Continued
-The Progressive Movement
-Textbook: Billings, Henry. History of Our World: People, Places, and Ideas. Steck- Vaughn Company. Austin, Texas. 2003.

-Skates and Cottage Industry(The process of industrialization)
-Progressive Groups project
-Unit Study Guide
-End of Unit Test

Lesson:
Objectives:
Key Terms:
Orientation:
Learning Activities:
Assessment/Closure
Resources

Lesson 1 Social Studies 9 Wed, August 13, 2008

Objectives:
(Look up specifics)
1. Students define and learn to use and evaluate different types of sources, both primary and secondary, to study a topic.
2. Students learn what primary sources are and how historians use primary sources to learn and make theories.

Key Terms and Concepts
Sources
Primary Source
Secondary Source
Artifact

Orientation
Teacher introduction
Students make name tags
Go over syllabus
First ppt and go over teacher’s artifact kit (See attachment for artifact kit activity in ppt)

Learning Activities
1. Teacher introduction
2. Students make name tags
3. Go over syllabus
4. First ppt and go over teacher’s artifact kit (See attachment for artifact kit activity in ppt)
5. Students make journal entry about how using only primary sources like artifacts can make it difficult for historians to get the “whole” story. They need to use multiple types of sources to get a more “accurate” picture of the past.

Homework: Students bring in their own artifact kits and bring back signed class contract.



Lesson 2 Social Studies 9: Student Introduction and review of sources August 19, 2008

Objectives:
Students continue to review different types of sources and how to evaluate them.
By the end of the lesson they should understand how historians use a multitude of different sources to ensure that they have the most accurate picture of history possible.
1. Reading Strategies - 1.1.1 Students extend and apply prereading strategies over increasingly complex reading tasks.
2. Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications

Key Terms:
Revolution, Industrial Revolution, Artifact, Primary Source, Secondary Source

Orientation:
Students retrienve books and share their own artifact kits and continue with the first powerpoint on evaluating different sources

Learning Activities:

-Students share artifact kits

-Students continue powerpoint on evaluating different sources

-As a class, make a KWL sheet about the Industrial Revolution

-Students, in groups, evaluate the article to answer an assigned question.
1. What is the Industrial Revolution and How is it a Revolution?
2. What happened during the Industrial Revolution
3. How did the Industrial Revolution change people's lives?
4. Was the Industrial Revolution good or bad?

Assessment/Closure:

Groups share aloud with the class what they found in the article to answer their assigned question


Resources:
-Social Studies grade 9 and 10 class Introduction day 1and day 2 ppt.
-Personal artifact kit of 5 things that represent the students
-Industrialization and Reading Skills article

Lesson 3 Social Studies 9: Reading Skills and Effects of Industrialization August 21, 2008

Objectives:
1. Reading Strategies - 1.1.1 Students extend and apply prereading strategies over increasingly complex reading tasks.
2. Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications
3. Students understand the concept of revolution as a big change in society and are able to articulate how the Industrial Revolution is a revolution.
4. Students gain a basic understanding of how the Industrial Revolution had both good and bad sides.


Key Terms:
Significant, Consequence, Disguise, Prohibit, Severe, Toxic, Cotton Mill

Orientation:
As a class, make a KWL sheet about the Industrial Revolution

Learning Activities:
Students, in groups, evaluate the article to answer an assigned question.
1. What is the Industrial Revolution and How is it a Revolution?
2. What happened during the Industrial Revolution
3. How did the Industrial Revolution change people's lives?
4. Was the Industrial Revolution good or bad?

Assessment/Closure:

-Groups share aloud with the class what they found in the article to answer their assigned question

-Study for reading terms vocabulary quiz next time!


Resources:
-Industrialization and Reading Skills article
-Powerpoint: Social Studies 9 Lesson 2

Lesson 4 Social Studies 9: Vocab quiz and Introduction to the PROs of the Industrial Revolution August 25, 2008

Objectives:
- By the end of this lesson students should have a good understanding of the pro’s of the Industrial Revolution. How it made it easier to produce goods faster and cheaper.

Key Terms:
- Industrialization
- Spinning Jenny
- Cotton Gin
- Technology
- Steamboat
- Telegraph
- Telephone
- Internal Combustion Engine
- Textile

Orientation:
Students review their picture note cards with one another and play pictionary with the new words they've learned

Learning Activities:

1. Students play Pictionary in their teams

2. Students use new words to write a summary of technological advances that were made during the Industrial Revolution

3.Introduce 5 WH notes on technology and pass out 5WH worksheet

4. As a class, read through page 368-369 section entitled "The Transportation Industry" and fill in the 5WH sheet for section 1

Assessment/Closure:
Homework: Finish 5WH worksheet for Water Transportation and Land Transportation section in textbook.

Resources
- Textbook: History of Our World: People, Places, and Ideas
- 5WH worksheet with transportation questions
- Powerpoint: “Social Studies 9 Lesson 2” AND “The Industrial Revolution Continued”
- Picture note cards


Lesson 5 Social Studies 9: Urbanization and the move from Cottage Industry to Factories August 27, 29

Objectives:
-By the end of this lesson, students should have a good understanding of how products were made in people’s homes (cottage industry) before the Industrial revolution and how life changed for many people once factories were built to produce in mass quantities.

Reading Strategies - 1.2.2 Students draw inferences and make generalizations.

Reading Strategies - 1.2.3 Students use a variety of study skills (graphic organizers, note-making) to clarify meaning and recognize organizational patterns.

Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications

Reading Strategies - 1.4.3 Students recall and organize information to clarify understanding (note-taking, summary, outline, chronology, cause & effect).

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.1 Understand basic economic concepts.

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.3 Explain patterns of trade from ancient times to the present.

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.5 Analyze relationships between economic activity and patterns of trade and migration.

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.7 Describe reciprocal influences of changes in transportation and communication and changes in trade and economic activities.

Reading Vocabulary/terms: 5WH, PLAN: Predict, Locate, Add, Note—Sequence Chart Survey, predict, recall

Key Terms:
- Urbanization
- Transportation
- Exploitation
- Cottage Industry
- Raw Materials
- Finished Product
- Skilled Labor
- Unskilled Labor

Orientation:

Answer Questions:

1. Have you ever spent a whole day working really hard? Perhaps spring cleaning, or a car wash to make money where not many people showed up to help.

2. How did you feel after working hard all day?

3. What can you tell me about the Industrial Revolution?

4. Why did women and children have to work in factories?

5. Why were the conditions so poor in the factories?

Learning Activities:

1. Review and Discuss 5WH homework

2. Orientation Activity

3. Show powerpoint on The Industrial Revolution Continued

4. Factory vs. Cottage/Craftsman economy assembly line activity

Assessment/Closure:
Finish ppt and discuss how conditions in the factories weren't very good. Have students journal about how they think it was to work in a factory during the Industrial Revolution.

Resources
- Textbook: History of Our World: People, Places, and Ideas
- 5WH worksheet with transportation questions
- Powerpoint: “The Industrial Revolution Continued”
- Picture note cards
- Cottage Industry Activity Sheets
- Colored Pencils
- Many pairs of scissors

Lesson 6 Social Studies 9: Child Labor Lesson September 2, 2008

Objectives:
- Students evaluate online resources to gain an understanding of poor working conditions for children in the factories during the industrial revolution

Reading Strategies - 1.4.1 Students monitor own comprehension and make appropriate modifications

Reading Strategies - 1.2.3 Students use a variety of study skills (graphic organizers, note-making) to clarify meaning and recognize organizational patterns.

Reading Strategies - 1.4.3 Students recall and organize information to clarify understanding (note-taking, summary, outline, chronology, cause & effect).

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.1 Understand basic economic concepts.

Production, Distribution, and Consumption - 7.3 Explain patterns of trade from ancient times to the present.

Science, Technology and Society - 8.7 Understand that the principal contexts of technological innovation and scientific research are commercial and military and understand the implications of these contexts.

Science, Technology and Society - 8.4 Evaluate whether changing technologies create new ethical dilemmas or make existing ethical dilemmas more acute.

ESLR: Analyzes, interprets, and evaluates information.


Key Terms:
-Child Labor
-Working Conditions
- Exploitation

Orientation:

Guiding Question

What was life like for the working children of the Industrial Revolution?

Introduce Assignment and Website

Learning Activities:
- Introduce assignment and model, once again, how to answer the 5WH questions about 4 links relating to Child Labor during the Industrial Revolution
- Give students the remainder of the period to explore the site and work in small
Group with students who struggle with English to answer the questions together.

Assessment/Closure:
-Students must finish the assignment for homework

Resources:
- http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRchild.htm
- Assignment on paper

Lesson 7 The Progressive Unit Introduction

Objectives: By the end of this lesson, students should have an understanding of how the poor conditions cause by the Industrial Revolution caused groups of people known as “Progressives” to try to make a change for the better.


Key Terms:
-Progressive groups
-Poverty
-violence
-greed
-upper class
-lower class
-middle class
-Karl Marx
-revolt
-strike
-Communist Manifesto
-journalist
-labor unions
-socialist
-feminists

Orientation:
Go over Child Labor reading and have students answer Do Now:
How were conditions for children working in the factories based on the web investigation you did during the last class? Give one personal story example from the reading you did.

Learning Activities:
Students look at the ppt and take notes

Assessment/Closure:
l Answer the following question to turn in at the end of class:
l What is a progressive? What problems did progressives try to solve? Why do you think these problems existed in the city? Do you think that these problems were ever solved? What evidence do you have?


Resources:
-ppt: “The Progressive Movement Draft”
-Child Labor homework assignment (completed)

Lesson 8: The Progressive Movement Continued September 10 and 12, 2008
Objectives: Students will gain a bit more of an understanding of Progressive groups by looking at labor unions. In particular, they should be able to explain the rise of unions and the conditions that led workers to go on strike and what was accomplished by organizing unions.

Key Terms:
-Labor Unions
-Newsies
-strike
-lower class
-middle class
-upper class
-publicity

Orientation:
Students share their answers to the question about what progressives are and the teacher gives an introduction to the movie “Newsies” which is about a labor union of newspaper boys who really got together to protest unfair prices of newspapers.

Learning Activities:
Students begin to watch the movie “Newsies” and answer questions on the “Newsies Questions” sheet to be handed out at the beginning of class.

Assessment/Closure:
Students hand in answered questions

Resources:
- dvd “Newsies”
- “Newsies Questions” worksheet

Lesson 9 : Introduction to Progressives Project Day 1

Note: This assignment was way too difficult for the students. They couldn’t find internet sites that they could understand well enough to complete this assignment so we had to totally scrap the project and I made up a new project where students (in the same groups) make a children’s book about Progressive books.

Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students should understand how a particular Progressive group worked to make a positive change in society after the Industrial Revolution. They should also be able to demonstrate group working skills, make an outline on an individual portion of a group project; utilize different technologies and creativity to make an engaging and educational presentation about a progressive group that is assigned to them.
-In addition, students should be able to evaluate internet sources for valuable information AND to evaluate whether or not an internet source is a reliable one.
-Also students should know how to correctly cite internet and book sources in a works cited page.

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists
Outline

Orientation:
Students are reminded of how Progressives like the “Newsies” wanted a positive change in society. Do Now: What did the “Newsies” want to change to make their lives better? Do you think that all unions after the Industrial Revolution were successful in getting what they wanted? Why or why not?
-Students are given the “Progressives” project and assigned to groups with a particular Progressive group to research and present on assigned to each group.
-They are also given an “Evaluating Websites” worksheet to help them to find 3 websites that they think are valid sources.

Learning Activities:

-Students go to the computer lab to evaluate websites for information on their assigned labor union

Assessment/Closure:
-Students fill out a packet with 3 different internet sources and why they think they are reliable sources

Resources
- “Progressive Project” assignment sheet
- “Examining Electronic Sources” sheet
- “Examining Electronic Sources on the Progressive Movement” packet with questions

Lesson 9 : Introduction to Progressives Project Day 2

Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students should understand how a particular Progressive group worked to make a positive change in society after the Industrial Revolution. They should also be able to demonstrate group working skills, make an outline on an individual portion of a group project; utilize different technologies and creativity to make an engaging and educational presentation about a progressive group that is assigned to them.
-In addition, students should be able to evaluate internet sources for valuable information AND to evaluate whether or not an internet source is a reliable one.
-Also students should know how to correctly cite internet and book sources in a works cited page.

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists
Outline

Orientation:
- Students meet in the computer lab and are reminded that last time we talked about how to find good sources for our project. This time we will use some of those sources to make an outline to help organize our ideas about each progressive group.

Learning Activities:
- Students get into their groups and are given the “GROUP Outline on Progressive Group” sheet with the expectations for their entire groups presentation.
- THEN they are given an “INDIVIDUAL Outline template to help them work on their individual outlines due from EACH student WITHIN groups. Also includes an example with the “Newsies” as an example.

Assessment/Closure
Research reflection
Students start to make their own outlines and fill in answers to questions for their assignment while the teacher walks around and facilitates with individuals and groups.

Resources
- Computers
- “GROUP Outline on Progressive Group” sheet with the expectations for their entire groups presentation.
- “INDIVIDUAL Outline template

Lesson 9 : Introduction to Progressives Project Day 3

Objectives:
-Students use the information they have gathered to create a powerpoint with animation to present what they have learned to the class.
-Students learn to cite their sources in a bibliography which is due the next class

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists
Outline
Works Cited Page

Orientation:
- Students meet in the lab again and have time to work on their ppts with animation.
- They also must be sure to include the information on their outline onto the powerpoint.

Learning Activities:
- Students use the information they have gathered to create a powerpoint with animation to present what they have learned to the class.
- Students are also given a copy of the presentation scoring guide for them to make sure they do everything they need to do to get a good grade on the presentation.

Assessment/Closure:
- teacher walks around and facilitates with individuals and groups.
- Answered questions due with bibliography next time

Resources
- Computers
- “How to cite your sources” sheet
- Scoring Guide

Note: This assignment was way too difficult for the students. They couldn’t find internet sites that they could understand well enough to complete this assignment so we had to totally scrap the project and I made up a new project where students (in the same groups) make a children’s book about Progressive books.

Lesson10: Progressive Project day 4: Handing out the NEW Progressive Project

Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students should be able to evaluate basic information about different Progressive Groups and synthesize content to answer assigned questions about their Progressive Groups in a way that 3rd grade students would understand.
- They will also utilize group work skills and practice how to use information they have learned to create a project that will educate younger students.

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists

Orientation:
Have students get into their groups and introduce NEW assignment and show an example of a children’s book (you may read to the class if you want) to illustrate how it gives a BRIEF overview of information about a subject. They will be expected to write a children’s book about their progressive groups

Learning Activities:
-Students get into their groups and work together to summarize the most basic information about their Progressive Groups to answer questions that will be a part of their book.
-They also start to work on illustrations to put in their books to help support the text.
- While the students work, walk around the room and answer any questions they still may have about the material and help them evaluate texts for information that they can understand.

Assessment/Closure:
Students must finish the answers to their questions by the end of class.

Resources:
- Internet Sources already printed out about each Progressive group:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists
- Book: Langly, Andrew. The Industrial Revolution. New York: Viking, 1994
- “Progressive Children’s Book” Assignment sheet
- Construction paper and white paper
- Colored Pencils
Lesson 11: Progressive Project Day 5

Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students should be confident about the answers to their questions for the book and should be able to make any finishing touches to their books which are due next class.

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists

Orientation:
Students get into their groups and finish up projects.

Learning Activities:
-Students get into their groups and work together to summarize the most basic information about their Progressive Groups to answer questions that will be a part of their book.
-They also start to work on illustrations to put in their books to help support the text.
- While the students work, walk around the room and answer any questions they still may have about the material and help them evaluate texts for information that they can understand.

Assessment/Closure:
- Reminder that books are due next class!

Resources:
- Internet Sources already printed out about each Progressive group:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists
- Book: Langly, Andrew. The Industrial Revolution. New York: Viking, 1994
- “Progressive Children’s Book” Assignment sheet
- Construction paper and white paper
- Colored Pencils
Lesson 12: Presentations
Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students will be able to show what they have learned about their assigned Progressive group and will also record information about other Progressive groups that their classmates will present on so they have an idea about how each group tried to make the world a better place.

Key Terms:
Labor Unions
Socialists
Feminists
Environmentalists

Orientation:
Give students some time to fill out the “Peer Evaluation” sheets where they rate each other based on how well they worked together in groups. And give them a few minutes to think about how they will present their books.

Learning Activities:
Once students complete and turn in peer evaluations, get them in a circle so they can share their books.
Hand out a “Student Evaluation” form with the questions that they should be able to answer based on their classmates’ books and a “Student Book Evaluation” checkmark sheet for them to fill in and grade.

Assessment/Closure
Resources:
-Completed books
-“Peer Evaluation” Form
-“Teacher Evaluation” Form
-“Teacher Book Evaluation” (check boxes)
-“Student Book Evaluation” (check boxes)

Lesson 13: Industrial Revolution and Progressive Group Wrap up and Review
Objectives:
By the end of this lesson, students should understand the Industrial Revolution, it’s impact on society and how it led to groups of “progressives” to try to make the work a better place.

Key Terms:
-Child Labor
-Communist Manifesto
-Spinning Jenny
-Cottage Industry
-Standard of Living
-Steamboat
-Technology
-Telegraph
-Transportation
-Urbanization
-Journalists
-Exploited
-strike

Orientation:
-Return Project Grades and go over any questions students may have
-Hand out “Industrial Revolution and Progressive Unit Study Guide”

Learning Activities:
-Students review their books, notes and ask the teacher to answer the questions on the
“Industrial Revolution and Progressive Unit Study Guide”

Assessment/Closure:
Go over the answers to the study guide.

Resources:
“Industrial Revolution and Progressive Unit Study Guide”

Lesson 14: Review Game
Objectives: Review
Key Terms: See Above
Orientation: Students have a few minutes to review their study guides and go over answers as a class
Learning Activities: Review game
Assessment/Closure: Ask about any other questions. Study!
Resources: “Industrial Revolution and Progressive Unit Study Guide”

Lesson 15: Test!
Objectives: Final Assessment
Key Terms: See above
Orientation: 5 min to study
Learning Activities: Test
Assessment/Closure: N/A
Resources: Industrial Revolution and Progressives Test